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141  structures 7772  species 2  interactions 42866  sequences 290  architectures

Family: 7tm_1 (PF00001)

Summary: 7 transmembrane receptor (rhodopsin family)

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This is the Wikipedia entry entitled "Rhodopsin-like receptors". More...

Rhodopsin-like receptors Edit Wikipedia article

Rhodopsin-like receptors
PDB 1f88 EBI.jpg
Structure of rhodopsin: A G protein-coupled receptor.[1]
Identifiers
Symbol 7tm_1
Pfam PF00001
InterPro IPR000276
PROSITE PDOC00211
SCOP 1f88
SUPERFAMILY 1f88
OPM superfamily 6
OPM protein 1gzm

Rhodopsin-like receptors are a family of proteins that comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors.[2]

Scope[edit]

G-protein-coupled receptors, GPCRs, constitute a vast protein family that encompasses a wide range of functions (including various autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine processes). They show considerable diversity at the sequence level, on the basis of which they can be separated into distinct groups. GPCRs are usually described as "superfamily" because they embrace a group of families for which there are indications of evolutionary relationship, but between which there is no statistically significant similarity in sequence.[2] The currently known superfamily members include the rhodopsin-like GPCRs (this family), the secretin-like GPCRs, the cAMP receptors, the fungal mating pheromone receptors, and the metabotropic glutamate receptor family. There is a specialised database for GPCRs.[3]

Function[edit]

The rhodopsin-like GPCRs themselves represent a widespread protein family that includes hormones, neurotransmitters, and light receptors, all of which transduce extracellular signals through interaction with guanine nucleotide-binding (G) proteins. Although their activating ligands vary widely in structure and character, the amino acid sequences of the receptors are very similar and are believed to adopt a common structural framework comprising 7 transmembrane (TM) helices.[4][5][6]

Classes[edit]

Rhodopsin-like GPCRs have been classified into the following 19 subgroups (A1-A19) based on a phylogenetic analysis.[7]

Subfamily A1[edit]

Subfamily A2[edit]

Subfamily A3[edit]

Subfamily A4[edit]

Subfamily A5[edit]

Subfamily A6[edit]

Subfamily A7[edit]

Subfamily A8[edit]

Subfamily A9[edit]

Subfamily A10[edit]

Subfamily A11[edit]

Subfamily A12[edit]

Subfamily A13[edit]

Subfamily A14[edit]

Subfamily A15[edit]

Subfamily A16[edit]

Subfamily A17[edit]

Subfamily A18[edit]

Subfamily A19[edit]

Unclassified[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palczewski K, Kumasaka T, Hori T, et al. (August 2000). "Crystal structure of rhodopsin: A G protein-coupled receptor". Science 289 (5480): 739–45. doi:10.1126/science.289.5480.739. PMID 10926528. 
  2. ^ a b Attwood TK, Findlay JB (1994). "Fingerprinting G-protein-coupled receptors". Protein Eng. 7 (2): 195–203. doi:10.1093/protein/7.2.195. PMID 8170923. 
  3. ^ "Information system for G protein-coupled receptors". GPCRDB. www.gpcr.org. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  4. ^ Birnbaumer L (1990). "G proteins in signal transduction". Annu. Rev. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 30: 675–705. doi:10.1146/annurev.pa.30.040190.003331. PMID 2111655. 
  5. ^ Gilman AG, Casey PJ (1988). "G protein involvement in receptor-effector coupling". J. Biol. Chem. 263 (6): 2577–2580. PMID 2830256. 
  6. ^ Attwood TK, Findlay JB (1993). "Design of a discriminating fingerprint for G-protein-coupled receptors". Protein Eng. 6 (2): 167–176. doi:10.1093/protein/6.2.167. PMID 8386361. 
  7. ^ Joost P, Methner A (2002). "Phylogenetic analysis of 277 human G-protein-coupled receptors as a tool for the prediction of orphan receptor ligands". Genome Biol 3 (11): research0063.1–0063.16. doi:10.1186/gb-2002-3-11-research0063. PMC 133447. PMID 12429062. 
  8. ^ Terakita A (2005). "The opsins". Genome Biol. 6 (3): 213. doi:10.1186/gb-2005-6-3-213. PMC 1088937. PMID 15774036. 

External links[edit]

This page is based on a Wikipedia article. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

This tab holds the annotation information that is stored in the Pfam database. As we move to using Wikipedia as our main source of annotation, the contents of this tab will be gradually replaced by the Wikipedia tab.

7 transmembrane receptor (rhodopsin family) Provide feedback

This family contains, amongst other G-protein-coupled receptors (GCPRs), members of the opsin family, which have been considered to be typical members of the rhodopsin superfamily. They share several motifs, mainly the seven transmembrane helices, GCPRs of the rhodopsin superfamily. All opsins bind a chromophore, such as 11-cis-retinal. The function of most opsins other than the photoisomerases is split into two steps: light absorption and G-protein activation. Photoisomerases, on the other hand, are not coupled to G-proteins - they are thought to generate and supply the chromophore that is used by visual opsins [1].

Literature references

  1. Terakita A; , Genome Biol 2005;6:213.: The opsins. PUBMED:15774036 EPMC:15774036


External database links

This tab holds annotation information from the InterPro database.

InterPro entry IPR000276

G-protein-coupled receptors, GPCRs, constitute a vast protein family that encompasses a wide range of functions (including various autocrine, paracrine and endocrine processes). They show considerable diversity at the sequence level, on the basis of which they can be separated into distinct groups. We use the term clan to describe the GPCRs, as they embrace a group of families for which there are indications of evolutionary relationship, but between which there is no statistically significant similarity in sequence [PUBMED:8170923]. The currently known clan members include the rhodopsin-like GPCRs, the secretin-like GPCRs, the cAMP receptors, the fungal mating pheromone receptors, and the metabotropic glutamate receptor family. There is a specialised database for GPCRs (http://www.gpcr.org/7tm/).

The rhodopsin-like GPCRs themselves represent a widespread protein family that includes hormone, neurotransmitter and light receptors, all of which transduce extracellular signals through interaction with guanine nucleotide-binding (G) proteins. Although their activating ligands vary widely in structure and character, the amino acid sequences of the receptors are very similar and are believed to adopt a common structural framework comprising 7 transmembrane (TM) helices [PUBMED:2111655, PUBMED:2830256, PUBMED:8386361].

Gene Ontology

The mapping between Pfam and Gene Ontology is provided by InterPro. If you use this data please cite InterPro.

Domain organisation

Below is a listing of the unique domain organisations or architectures in which this domain is found. More...

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Pfam Clan

This family is a member of clan GPCR_A (CL0192), which has the following description:

This clan contains various seven-transmembrane receptors and related proteins. A major member is Pfam:PF00001, members of which have been considered to be typical members of the rhodopsin superfamily. Many members of this clan are Caenorhabditis proteins, suggesting great expansion of the relevant families in these nematode worms.

The clan contains the following 35 members:

7TM-7TMR_HD 7tm_1 7tm_2 7tm_4 7TM_GPCR_Sra 7TM_GPCR_Srab 7TM_GPCR_Srb 7TM_GPCR_Srbc 7TM_GPCR_Srd 7TM_GPCR_Srh 7TM_GPCR_Sri 7TM_GPCR_Srj 7TM_GPCR_Srsx 7TM_GPCR_Srt 7TM_GPCR_Sru 7TM_GPCR_Srv 7TM_GPCR_Srw 7TM_GPCR_Srx 7TM_GPCR_Srz 7TM_GPCR_Str Bac_rhodopsin Dicty_CAR DUF1182 DUF621 Frizzled Git3 Git3_C GpcrRhopsn4 Lung_7-TM_R Ocular_alb Serpentine_r_xa Sre Srg TAS2R V1R

Alignments

We store a range of different sequence alignments for families. As well as the seed alignment from which the family is built, we provide the full alignment, generated by searching the sequence database using the family HMM. We also generate alignments using four representative proteomes (RP) sets, the NCBI sequence database, and our metagenomics sequence database. More...

View options

We make a range of alignments for each Pfam-A family. You can see a description of each above. You can view these alignments in various ways but please note that some types of alignment are never generated while others may not be available for all families, most commonly because the alignments are too large to handle.

  Seed
(64)
Full
(42866)
Representative proteomes NCBI
(63287)
Meta
(11)
RP15
(5181)
RP35
(6677)
RP55
(11247)
RP75
(17156)
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1Cannot generate PP/Heatmap alignments for seeds; no PP data available

Key: ✓ available, x not generated, not available.

Format an alignment

  Seed
(64)
Full
(42866)
Representative proteomes NCBI
(63287)
Meta
(11)
RP15
(5181)
RP35
(6677)
RP55
(11247)
RP75
(17156)
Alignment:
Format:
Order:
Sequence:
Gaps:
Download/view:

Download options

We make all of our alignments available in Stockholm format. You can download them here as raw, plain text files or as gzip-compressed files.

  Seed
(64)
Full
(42866)
Representative proteomes NCBI
(63287)
Meta
(11)
RP15
(5181)
RP35
(6677)
RP55
(11247)
RP75
(17156)
Raw Stockholm Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download  
Gzipped Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download  

You can also download a FASTA format file containing the full-length sequences for all sequences in the full alignment.

External links

MyHits provides a collection of tools to handle multiple sequence alignments. For example, one can refine a seed alignment (sequence addition or removal, re-alignment or manual edition) and then search databases for remote homologs using HMMER3.

HMM logo

HMM logos is one way of visualising profile HMMs. Logos provide a quick overview of the properties of an HMM in a graphical form. You can see a more detailed description of HMM logos and find out how you can interpret them here. More...

Trees

This page displays the phylogenetic tree for this family's seed alignment. We use FastTree to calculate neighbour join trees with a local bootstrap based on 100 resamples (shown next to the tree nodes). FastTree calculates approximately-maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees from our seed alignment.

Note: You can also download the data file for the tree.

Curation and family details

This section shows the detailed information about the Pfam family. You can see the definitions of many of the terms in this section in the glossary and a fuller explanation of the scoring system that we use in the scores section of the help pages.

Curation View help on the curation process

Seed source: Prosite
Previous IDs: none
Type: Family
Author: Sonnhammer ELL
Number in seed: 64
Number in full: 42866
Average length of the domain: 225.60 aa
Average identity of full alignment: 18 %
Average coverage of the sequence by the domain: 72.53 %

HMM information View help on HMM parameters

HMM build commands:
build method: hmmbuild -o /dev/null HMM SEED
search method: hmmsearch -Z 23193494 -E 1000 --cpu 4 HMM pfamseq
Model details:
Parameter Sequence Domain
Gathering cut-off 23.8 23.8
Trusted cut-off 23.8 23.8
Noise cut-off 23.7 23.7
Model length: 257
Family (HMM) version: 16
Download: download the raw HMM for this family

Species distribution

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Interactions

There are 2 interactions for this family. More...

V-set Rhodopsin_N

Structures

For those sequences which have a structure in the Protein DataBank, we use the mapping between UniProt, PDB and Pfam coordinate systems from the PDBe group, to allow us to map Pfam domains onto UniProt sequences and three-dimensional protein structures. The table below shows the structures on which the 7tm_1 domain has been found. There are 141 instances of this domain found in the PDB. Note that there may be multiple copies of the domain in a single PDB structure, since many structures contain multiple copies of the same protein seqence.

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