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2  structures 5  species 0  interactions 6  sequences 1  architecture

Family: BDV_P40 (PF06407)

Summary: Borna disease virus P40 protein

Pfam includes annotations and additional family information from a range of different sources. These sources can be accessed via the tabs below.

This is the Wikipedia entry entitled "Bornavirus". More...

Bornavirus Edit Wikipedia article

Bornavirus
Virus classification
Group: Group V ((-)ssRNA)
Order: Mononegavirales
Family: Bornaviridae
Genus: Bornavirus
Type Species

Bornavirus is a genus of viruses in the order Mononegavirales. Horses, sheep, cattle, rodents, birds, and humans serve as natural hosts. There are currently five species in this genus, and it is the only genus in its family (Bornaviridae). Diseases associated with this genus include: mammals borna disease : fatal neurologic disease, restricted to central Europe. birds: encephalitis, proventricular dilatation disease.[1][2]

Taxonomy

Group: ssRNA(-)

[2]

Structure

Viruses in Bornavirus are enveloped, with spherical geometries. The diameter is around 70 to 130 nm. Genomes are linear, around 8.9kb in length. The genome codes for 9 proteins. [1]

Genus Structure Symmetry Capsid Genomic Arrangement Genomic Segmentation
Bornavirus Spherical Enveloped Linear Monopartite

Life Cycle

Viral replication is nuclear. Entry into the host cell is achieved by attachment of the viral GP glycoproteins to host receptors, which mediates clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Replication follows the negative stranded RNA virus replication model. Negative stranded rna virus transcription, using polymerase stuttering, with some alternative splicing mechanism is the method of transcription. The virus exits the host cell by nuclear pore export. Horses, sheep, cattle, rodents, birds, and humans serve as the natural host. Transmission routes are fomite, contact, urine, feces, and saliva.[1]

Genus Host Details Tissue Tropism Entry Details Release Details Replication Site Assembly Site Transmission
Bornavirus Horses; sheep; cattle; rodents; birds; humans Neurons; astrocytes; oligodendrocytes; ependymal cells Clathrin-mediated endocytosis Budding Nucleus[3] Cytoplasm Fomites; contact: saliva; contact: urine; contact: feces

Pathogenicity

Between 2011 and 2013, three German breeders of variegated squirrels (Sciurus variegatoides) had encephalitis with similar clinical signs and died 2 to 4 months after onset of the clinical symptoms. Genomic analysis found a previously unknown bornavirus in a contact squirrel and in brain tissue from the three men, the researchers reported, and it is the "likely causative agent" in their deaths. Prior to this, Bornavirus species were not thought to be responsible for human diseases.[4][5]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Viral Zone". ExPASy. Retrieved 12 June 2015. 
  2. ^ a b ICTV. "Virus Taxonomy: 2014 Release". Retrieved 12 June 2015. 
  3. ^ Veterinary Microbiology and microbial disease, 2nd edition, P J Quinn et al. Wiley-Blackwell
  4. ^ A Variegated Squirrel Bornavirus Associated with Fatal Human Encephalitis
  5. ^ Zoonotic bornavirus from variegated squirrel tied to fatal CNS infections in German breeders.

External links

This page is based on a Wikipedia article. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

This tab holds the annotation information that is stored in the Pfam database. As we move to using Wikipedia as our main source of annotation, the contents of this tab will be gradually replaced by the Wikipedia tab.

Borna disease virus P40 protein Provide feedback

This family consists of several Borna disease virus P40 proteins. Borna disease (BD) is a persistent viral infection of the central nervous system caused by the single-negative-strand, nonsegmented RNA Borna disease virus (BDV). P40 is known to be a nucleoprotein [1].

Literature references

  1. Planz O, Stitz L; , J Virol 1999;73:1715-1718.: Borna disease virus nucleoprotein (p40) is a major target for CD8(+)-T-cell-mediated immune response. PUBMED:9882386 EPMC:9882386


External database links

This tab holds annotation information from the InterPro database.

InterPro entry IPR009441

This entry represents P40 nucleoproteins from several Borna disease virus (BDV) strains. BDV is an RNA virus that is a member of the Mononegavirales family, which includes such members as Measles virus and Ebola virus sp.. BDV causes an infection of the central nervous system in a wide range of vertebrates, which can progress to an often fatal immune-mediated disease. Viral nucleoproteins are central to transcription, replication, and packaging of the RNA genome. P40 nucleoprotein from BDV is multi-helical in structure and can be divided into two subdomains, each of which has an alpha-bundle topology [PUBMED:9882386]. The nucleoprotein assembles into a planar homotetramer, with the RNA genome either wrapping around the outside of the tetramer or possibly fitting within the charged central channel of the tetramer [PUBMED:14527390].

Domain organisation

Below is a listing of the unique domain organisations or architectures in which this domain is found. More...

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Alignments

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We make a range of alignments for each Pfam-A family. You can see a description of each above. You can view these alignments in various ways but please note that some types of alignment are never generated while others may not be available for all families, most commonly because the alignments are too large to handle.

  Seed
(1)
Full
(6)
Representative proteomes UniProt
(288)
NCBI
(224)
Meta
(0)
RP15
(3)
RP35
(3)
RP55
(3)
RP75
(6)
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Key: ✓ available, x not generated, not available.

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  Seed
(1)
Full
(6)
Representative proteomes UniProt
(288)
NCBI
(224)
Meta
(0)
RP15
(3)
RP35
(3)
RP55
(3)
RP75
(6)
Alignment:
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We make all of our alignments available in Stockholm format. You can download them here as raw, plain text files or as gzip-compressed files.

  Seed
(1)
Full
(6)
Representative proteomes UniProt
(288)
NCBI
(224)
Meta
(0)
RP15
(3)
RP35
(3)
RP55
(3)
RP75
(6)
Raw Stockholm Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download    
Gzipped Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download   Download    

You can also download a FASTA format file containing the full-length sequences for all sequences in the full alignment.

HMM logo

HMM logos is one way of visualising profile HMMs. Logos provide a quick overview of the properties of an HMM in a graphical form. You can see a more detailed description of HMM logos and find out how you can interpret them here. More...

Trees

This page displays the phylogenetic tree for this family's seed alignment. We use FastTree to calculate neighbour join trees with a local bootstrap based on 100 resamples (shown next to the tree nodes). FastTree calculates approximately-maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees from our seed alignment.

Note: You can also download the data file for the tree.

Curation and family details

This section shows the detailed information about the Pfam family. You can see the definitions of many of the terms in this section in the glossary and a fuller explanation of the scoring system that we use in the scores section of the help pages.

Curation View help on the curation process

Seed source: Pfam-B_15995 (release 9.0)
Previous IDs: none
Type: Family
Author: Moxon SJ
Number in seed: 1
Number in full: 6
Average length of the domain: 263.70 aa
Average identity of full alignment: 55 %
Average coverage of the sequence by the domain: 88.23 %

HMM information View help on HMM parameters

HMM build commands:
build method: hmmbuild -o /dev/null HMM SEED
search method: hmmsearch -Z 11927849 -E 1000 --cpu 4 HMM pfamseq
Model details:
Parameter Sequence Domain
Gathering cut-off 25.0 25.0
Trusted cut-off 44.8 44.4
Noise cut-off 22.8 22.5
Model length: 370
Family (HMM) version: 8
Download: download the raw HMM for this family

Species distribution

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Structures

For those sequences which have a structure in the Protein DataBank, we use the mapping between UniProt, PDB and Pfam coordinate systems from the PDBe group, to allow us to map Pfam domains onto UniProt sequences and three-dimensional protein structures. The table below shows the structures on which the BDV_P40 domain has been found. There are 2 instances of this domain found in the PDB. Note that there may be multiple copies of the domain in a single PDB structure, since many structures contain multiple copies of the same protein seqence.

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