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0  structures 205  species 0  interactions 279  sequences 11  architectures

Family: Zw10 (PF06248)

Summary: Centromere/kinetochore Zw10

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This is the Wikipedia entry entitled "ZW10". More...

ZW10 Edit Wikipedia article

Zw10 kinetochore protein
Identifiers
Symbols ZW10 ; HZW10; KNTC1AP
External IDs OMIM603954 MGI1349478 HomoloGene37959 GeneCards: ZW10 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE ZW10 204812 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 9183 26951
Ensembl ENSG00000086827 ENSMUSG00000032264
UniProt O43264 O54692
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_004724 NM_012039
RefSeq (protein) NP_004715 NP_036169
Location (UCSC) Chr 11:
113.73 – 113.77 Mb
Chr 9:
49.06 – 49.08 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Centromere/kinetochore protein zw10 homolog is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ZW10 gene.[1][2] This gene encodes a protein that is one of many involved in mechanisms to ensure proper chromosome segregation during cell division. The encoded protein binds to centromeres during the prophase, metaphase, and early anaphase cell division stages and to kinetochore microtubules during metaphase.[2]

Function

Zw10
Identifiers
Symbol Zw10
Pfam PF06248
Pfam clan CL0295
InterPro IPR009361

Zeste white 10 (ZW10) was initially identified as a mitotic checkpoint protein involved in chromosome segregation, and then implicated in targeting cytoplasmic dynein and dynactin to mitotic kinetochores, but it is also important in non-dividing cells. These include cytoplasmic dynein targeting to Golgi and other membranes, and SNARE-mediated ER-Golgi trafficking.[3][4] Dominant-negative ZW10, anti-ZW10 antibody, and ZW10 RNA interference (RNAi) cause Golgi dispersal. ZW10 RNAi also disperse endosomes and lysosomes.[4]

Drosophila kinetochore components Rough deal (Rod) and Zw10 are required for the proper functioning of the metaphase checkpoint in flies.[5] The eukaryotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors microtubule attachment to kinetochores and prevents anaphase onset until all kinetochores are aligned on the metaphase plate. It is an essential surveillance mechanism that ensures high fidelity chromosome segregation during mitosis. In higher eukaryotes, cytoplasmic dynein is involved in silencing the SAC by removing the checkpoint proteins Mad2 and the Rod-Zw10-Zwilch complex (RZZ) from aligned kinetochores.[6][7][8]

Interactions

ZW10 has been shown to interact with RINT1[9]

References

  1. ^ Starr DA, Williams BC, Li Z, Etemad-Moghadam B, Dawe RK, Goldberg ML (Oct 1997). "Conservation of the centromere/kinetochore protein ZW10". J Cell Biol 138 (6): 1289–301. doi:10.1083/jcb.138.6.1289. PMC 2132553. PMID 9298984. 
  2. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: ZW10 ZW10, kinetochore associated, homolog (Drosophila)". 
  3. ^ Vallee RB, Varma D, Dujardin DL (November 2006). "ZW10 function in mitotic checkpoint control, dynein targeting and membrane trafficking: is dynein the unifying theme?". Cell Cycle 5 (21): 2447–51. doi:10.4161/cc.5.21.3395. PMC 2794429. PMID 17102640. 
  4. ^ a b Varma D, Dujardin DL, Stehman SA, Vallee RB (February 2006). "Role of the kinetochore/cell cycle checkpoint protein ZW10 in interphase cytoplasmic dynein function". J. Cell Biol. 172 (5): 655–62. doi:10.1083/jcb.200510120. PMC 2063698. PMID 16505164. 
  5. ^ Basto R, Gomes R, Karess RE (December 2000). "Rough deal and Zw10 are required for the metaphase checkpoint in Drosophila". Nat. Cell Biol. 2 (12): 939–43. doi:10.1038/35046592. PMID 11146659. 
  6. ^ Griffis ER, Stuurman N, Vale RD (June 2007). "Spindly, a novel protein essential for silencing the spindle assembly checkpoint, recruits dynein to the kinetochore". J. Cell Biol. 177 (6): 1005–15. doi:10.1083/jcb.200702062. PMC 2064361. PMID 17576797. 
  7. ^ Famulski JK, Vos L, Sun X, Chan G (February 2008). "Stable hZW10 kinetochore residency, mediated by hZwint-1 interaction, is essential for the mitotic checkpoint". J. Cell Biol. 180 (3): 507–20. doi:10.1083/jcb.200708021. PMC 2234252. PMID 18268100. 
  8. ^ Yang Z, Tulu US, Wadsworth P, Rieder CL (June 2007). "Kinetochore dynein is required for chromosome motion and congression independent of the spindle checkpoint". Curr. Biol. 17 (11): 973–80. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2007.04.056. PMC 2570756. PMID 17509882. 
  9. ^ Hirose H, Arasaki K, Dohmae N, Takio K, Hatsuzawa K, Nagahama M, Tani K, Yamamoto A, Tohyama M, Tagaya M (March 2004). "Implication of ZW10 in membrane trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi". EMBO J. 23 (6): 1267–78. doi:10.1038/sj.emboj.7600135. PMC 381410. PMID 15029241. 

Further reading

This page is based on a Wikipedia article. The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

This tab holds the annotation information that is stored in the Pfam database. As we move to using Wikipedia as our main source of annotation, the contents of this tab will be gradually replaced by the Wikipedia tab.

Centromere/kinetochore Zw10 Provide feedback

Zw10 and rough deal proteins are both required for correct metaphase check-pointing during mitosis [1,2]. These proteins bind to the centromere/kinetochore [2].

Literature references

  1. Basto R, Gomes R, Karess RE; , Nat Cell Biol 2000;2:939-943.: Rough deal and Zw10 are required for the metaphase checkpoint in Drosophila. PUBMED:11146659 EPMC:11146659

  2. Chan GK, Jablonski SA, Starr DA, Goldberg ML, Yen TJ; , Nat Cell Biol 2000;2:944-947.: Human Zw10 and ROD are mitotic checkpoint proteins that bind to kinetochores. PUBMED:11146660 EPMC:11146660


External database links

This tab holds annotation information from the InterPro database.

InterPro entry IPR009361

Zeste white 10 (ZW10) was initially identified as a mitotic checkpoint protein involved in chromosome segregation, and then implicated in targeting cytoplasmic dynein and dynactin to mitotic kinetochores, but it is also important in non-dividing cells. These include cytoplasmic dynein targeting to Golgi and other membranes, and SNARE-mediated ER-Golgi trafficking [PUBMED:17102640, PUBMED:16505164]. Dominant-negative ZW10, anti-ZW10 antibody, and ZW10 RNA interference (RNAi) cause Golgi dispersal. ZW10 RNAi also disperse endosomes and lysosomes [PUBMED:16505164].

Drosophila kinetochore components Rough deal (Rod) and Zw10 are required for the proper functioning of the metaphase checkpoint in flies [PUBMED:11146659]. The eukaryotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors microtubule attachment to kinetochores and prevents anaphase onset until all kinetochores are aligned on the metaphase plate. It is an essential surveillance mechanism that ensures high fidelity chromosome segregation during mitosis. In higher eukaryotes, cytoplasmic dynein is involved in silencing the SAC by removing the checkpoint proteins Mad2 and the Rod-Zw10-Zwilch complex (RZZ) from aligned kinetochores [PUBMED:17576797, PUBMED:18268100, PUBMED:17509882].

Gene Ontology

The mapping between Pfam and Gene Ontology is provided by InterPro. If you use this data please cite InterPro.

Domain organisation

Below is a listing of the unique domain organisations or architectures in which this domain is found. More...

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Pfam Clan

This family is a member of clan Vps51 (CL0295), which has the following description:

This clan includes an N-terminal domain from several vesicle transport proteins that are related to Vps51.

The clan contains the following 16 members:

COG2 COG5 COG6 Dor1 DUF2450 Exo70 Sec15 Sec3_C Sec3_C_2 Sec5 Sec6 Sec8_exocyst Vps51 Vps52 Vps53_N Zw10

Alignments

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Full
(279)
Representative proteomes NCBI
(344)
Meta
(1)
RP15
(64)
RP35
(100)
RP55
(147)
RP75
(185)
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  Seed
(12)
Full
(279)
Representative proteomes NCBI
(344)
Meta
(1)
RP15
(64)
RP35
(100)
RP55
(147)
RP75
(185)
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External links

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Curation and family details

This section shows the detailed information about the Pfam family. You can see the definitions of many of the terms in this section in the glossary and a fuller explanation of the scoring system that we use in the scores section of the help pages.

Curation View help on the curation process

Seed source: Pfam-B_9476 (release 9.0)
Previous IDs: none
Type: Family
Author: Finn RD
Number in seed: 12
Number in full: 279
Average length of the domain: 435.20 aa
Average identity of full alignment: 19 %
Average coverage of the sequence by the domain: 61.30 %

HMM information View help on HMM parameters

HMM build commands:
build method: hmmbuild -o /dev/null HMM SEED
search method: hmmsearch -Z 23193494 -E 1000 --cpu 4 HMM pfamseq
Model details:
Parameter Sequence Domain
Gathering cut-off 19.3 19.3
Trusted cut-off 19.6 19.3
Noise cut-off 19.2 19.2
Model length: 593
Family (HMM) version: 8
Download: download the raw HMM for this family

Species distribution

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